President's Report

College Presidents Report February/March 2022

Appointments

 

The Next President of the University of Wisconsin System Selected

Jay Rothman will become the next president of the UW System in June. He will replace President Tommy Thompson who steps down in March.

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Moore College of Art and Design Names Next President

Cathy Young, currently executive director and SVP of the Boston Conservatory at Berklee College of Music, will be the new president at Moore College of Art and Design. Young will succeed current President Cecelia Fitzgibbon in July 2022.

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***Stay up-to-date with all the turnover in Higher Ed through HigherEd Direct…Try our database today for free HERE.

 

Eastern Washington University Selects New President

Provost and VP for academic affairs at California State University at San Bernardino Dr. Shari McMahan will be Eastern Washington’s next president. She will replace interim president David May this summer.

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New President Appointed at Oklahoma City Community College

Dr. Mautra Jones will be the next president of Oklahoma City CC. She is presently the VP of institutional advancement and external affairs at Langston University.

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Lake-Sumter State College Names Next President

Dr. Heather Bigard will become Lake-Sumter’s next president in July. She will succeed Dr. Stan Sidor who retires at the end of June.

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Midwestern State University Appoints 12th President

Dr. JuliAnn Mazachek will be Midwestern’s next president. She is currently vice president for academic affairs at Washburn University.

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New President Named at Canisius College

Canisius College Board of Directors has chosen Dr. Steve Stoute as its 25th president. Stoute, currently a VP at DePaul University, will begin in his new position in July 2022.

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Rockhurst University Selects Next President

Rockhurst University has named Sandra Cassady as their 15th president. Cassady will be the university’s first female and first lay president.

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New President Named at Santa Clara University

Dr. Julie H. Sullivan has been chosen as Santa Clara’s next president. Sullivan currently serves as president of the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota.

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Dickinson College Appoints 30th President

John E. Jones III, currently Dickinson’s interim president, has been appointed president on a permanent basis. Jones has been the interim president since June 2021.

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Interim President at Harris-Stowe University Selected as Next President

Harris-Stowe University has selected its Interim President Dr. LaTonia Collins Smith as the new president. Collins Smith succeeds Dr. Cory Bradford who accepted a position at a research university.

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Cazenovia College Announces New President

Dr. David Bergh, currently interim president at Cazenovia, has been named the 30th president. He succeeds Dr. Ron Chesbrough who retired in January 2022.

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New President Selected by Ithaca College

Ithaca College Appoints Dr. La Jerne Terry Cornish president. She has been serving as interim president since August 2021.

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St. Bonaventure University Names Future President

Dr. Jeff Gingerich has been named president at St. Bonaventure. He currently serves as provost and VP of academic affairs at the University of Scranton.

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Kennesaw State University Chooses Next President

Interim President Dr. Kathy Schwaig has been appointed Kennesaw’s next president. She previously served as provost and SVP for academic affairs at Kennesaw.

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Randolph College Appoints New President

Randolph College appoints Sue Ott Rowlands as president. She will replace President Bradley Bateman who retires in June.

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Western University of Health Sciences Announces New President

Dr. Robin Farias-Eisner has been selected as WesternU’s president. Eisner was previously chief academic officer in the School of Medicine at Creighton University.

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Interim President Named at Saint Cloud Technical & Community College

Saint Cloud Tech & CC names VP/CFO Lori Kloos interim president. She replaces President Annesa Cheek who has accepted a position at Frederick Community College.

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Western Nevada College Appoints Interim President

Western Nevada College appointed Dr. J. Kyle Dalpe as interim president effective March 2022 Currently Dalpe serves as provost/VP of finance there.

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Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Names 10th President

Toyin Tofade will be Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences’ next president.  She begins her term in July 2022.

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New President Selected for Bemidji State University and Northwest Technical College in Minnesota

Bemidji State U and Northwest Tech College will share a new president – Dr. John Hoffman. Hoffman is currently VC for academic/student affairs at the University of Minnesota-Crookston.

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Ursinus College Announces New President

Robyn Hannigan will be Ursinus College’s new president. Hannigan comes from Clarkson University where she serves as provost.

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The State Board for Community Colleges Selects the next Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges

The next chancellor of Virginia’s CCs will be Russell A. Kavalhuna. Kavalhuna is currently president of Henry Ford College in MI.

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Saint Martin’s University Appoints New President

Saint Martin’s appoints Dr. Jennifer Bonds-Raacke as its next president. Bonds-Raacke is currently the provost and VP for academic affairs at St. Norbert College.

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New President Named at Ferris State University

Ferris State has named Bill Pink as its 19th president. Pink will succeed current President Dr. David Eisler who retires at the end of June 2022.

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Calvin University Appoints Next President

The next president of Calvin University will be Dr. Wiebe Boer. Boer will replace Dr. Michael K. Le Roy who retires at the end of the 21-22 academic year.

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Clarkson University Names New President

Clarkson U names Marc P. Christensen as its next president. Christensen will succeed Dr. Anthony G. Collins who is stepping down at the end of June 2022.

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New President Appointed at Roanoke College

Roanoke College appoints Dr. Frank Shushok Jr. as its 21st president. He will take over from President Michael C. Maxey who retires in July.

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University of South Florida Chooses Alum as President

USF picks Dr. Rhea Law as its next president. Law will be the first alum to lead the university.

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Interim Chancellor Named at the California State University System

Jolene Koester is selected as CSU System’s interim chancellor. Koester will succeed President Joseph Castro who retired in February 2022.

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University of Illinois Springfield Appoints Next Chancellor

UI Springfield appoints Janet L. Gooch as chancellor effective July 2022.  Gooch is the EVP for academic affairs and provost at Truman State University.

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Grand View University Announces Next President

Grand View has selected Dr. Rachelle Keck as its next president. Keck is currently president of Briar Cliff University.

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New President Named at Wartburg College

Rebecca Neiduski is named president of Wartburg College effective July 1, 2022. She will succeed retiring President Dr. Darrel Colson.

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Retirements

 

Pitzer College President Announces Retirement

President at Pitzer College since 2016, Melvin L. Oliver will retire at the end of June 2022. Pitzer Trustee Jill Klein will serve as interim president effective July 2022.

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Eastern New Mexico University President to Retire

Patrice Caldwell, currently president and system chancellor at ENMU announced her plans to retire at the end of July.  She has been with ENMU for 42 years.

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President of Slippery Rock University Announces Retirement

William Behre will retire as president of Slippery Rock University in June 2023. He has been president there since July 2018.

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Columbus State University President Retires

Vice Chancellor for Organizational Effectiveness Dr. John M. Fuchko III has been chosen as interim president of Columbus State effective July 2022. He will replace Dr. Chris Markwood who retires at the end of June.

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Lamar Community College President to Retire

Lamar CC President Dr. Linda Lujan will retire in December 2022. Lujan has worked in higher education for almost 40 years.

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Resignations

 

Chancellor at Contra Costa Community College District Resigns

Dr. Bryan Reece resigned from Contra Costa CC District effective February 2022. EVC for education & technology Mojdeh Mehdizadeh is the interim president.

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MIT President to Step Down

L. Rafael Reif plans to step down as president of MIT at the end of this year. He has been at MIT since 1980 and president for the last 10 years.

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Worcester Polytechnic Institute President Departs for Jet Propulsion Lab

Laurie Leshin will be stepping down as president of Worcester Polytechnic Institute in May.  She will be the next director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and VP at Caltech.

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Mount Holyoke College President to Step Down

Mount Holyoke College President Sonya Stephens will resign in August 2022. She has accepted the position of president of the American University of Paris.

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Northeast State University President Resigns

Dr. Bethany Bullock resigns from Northeast State. VP for Academic Affairs Dr. Connie Marshall will become interim president.

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Chancellor of Indiana University Kokomo to Step Down

Indiana University Kokomo Chancellor Susan Sciame-Giesecke will step down. She has been appointed VP for regional campuses and online education at Indiana University Bloomington effective May 1, 2022.

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College President's Report

College President’s Report January 2022

Appointments

 

Auburn Names Next President

Christopher B. Roberts, current dean of the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering, has been selected as the next president at Auburn University. Robert’s will become the University’s 21st president on May 16.

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Lassalle University Hires New President

Danielle Allen has been confirmed as the 30th president at Lassalle University. Allen will replace Colleen Hanycz who left for Xavier this past summer. Allen will begin his tenure in April.

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***Stay up-to-date with all the turnover in Higher Ed through HigherEd Direct…Try our database today for free HERE.

 

Pillar College Names New President

Current COO and executive VP of Pillar College, Rupert Hayles Jr. has been announced as Pillar College’s new president. He will succeed David Schroeder, who has been named chancellor of the school.

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New President Announced at Scripps College

Suzanne Keen will become the next president of Scripps College. She currently serves as VP for academic affairs and dean of faculty at Hamilton College. She will begin on July 1st of this year.

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Georgetown College Announces New President

Rosemary Allen has been named the first female president of Georgetown College in Kentucky. Allen currently serves as provost and dean at the school.

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NJ Institute of Technology Names Next President

Teik C. Lim has been announced as the next president at the NJ Institute of Technology. Lim currently serves as the interim president of UT Arlington. He will begin his tenure on July 1st.

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New President Named at Framingham State

Current provost and VP for academic affairs at Maryland-Eastern Shore, Nancy Niemi, has been named the next president of Framingham State University, in Massachusetts. Niemi will succeed the retiring F. Javier Cervallos on July 1st.

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Penn College of Technology Announces Next President

VP for academic affairs at Penn College of Technology, Michael J. Reed, has been announced to succeed Davie Gilmour as president. He will begin on July 1st.

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Rhode Island School of Design Names Next President

Crystal Williams has been announced the next president of RI School of Design. Williams currently serves as VP and associate provost for community and inclusion at Boston University. She will replace interim president Dave Proulx.

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Montgomery College Announces Next President

Current president of Nassau CC, Jermain Williams, has been named president of Montgomery College, in Maryland. Williams will replace Interim President Dave Proulx in June.

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St. John’s Announces New President

Former president of Providence College, Rev. Brian J. Shanley, has been selected as the next president at St. John’s University. Rev. Shanley will replace Conrad Gempesaw, who will retire in June 2021.

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Scripps College Names New President,

Current COO and Executive VP of Pillar College, Rupert A Hayes Jr, has been named president at Scripps College. He will succeed David Schroeder.

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New President at Southern Illinois

James T. Minor has been named the next chancellor at Southern Illinois University. Minor currently serves as the assistant vice chancellor and senior strategist in the office of the chancellor at Cal State University. He will become the school’s 10th chancellor on March 1st.

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MIT Provost named President at RPI

Martin A Schmidt has been named the next president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Schmidt currently serves as provost at MIT and will begin his tenure on July 1st.

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Retirements

President at Indiana Wesleyan to Retire

David Wright, current president of Indiana Wesleyan has announced his plan to retire at the end of this academic year. Wright has served the school since 2013.

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Flagler President Announces Retirement

President Joseph G. Joyner will retire after the 2020-21 academic year. Joyner joined the school in 2017. A national search is currently underway to find Flagler’s next president.

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SW Oklahoma State President Retiring

President Randy Beutler has announced plans to retire from Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Beutler has served as the university’s president since February of 2010.

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Victor to Retire from Mercyhurst

President Michael T. Victor has announced his plans to retire from Mercyhurst University this June. Victor began his tenure as the school’s 12th president in August of 2015. A search for the next president is currently underway.

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Resignations

Michigan President Fired

Mark Schlissel has been fired by The University of Michigan Board of Regents. The decision comes after and investigation into an anonymous report that he was having an affair with a subordinate employee.

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FIU President Resigns

Florida International University President Mark Rosenburg has resigned as president.  Initially citing health concerns, Rosenburg released an additional statement saying he “caused discomfort for a valued colleague.” Rosenburg has served at FIU since 1976.

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University of Florida President Announces Resignation

Kent Fuchs has announced his plant to step down as president at the University of Florida. Fuchs is beginning his eighth year as leader at the school. He said he plans to officially resign from the post once a successor is named.

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Texas A&M President Resigning Earlier than Expected

President Michael Young has announced his plans to leave his roll as president at Texas A&M. Young previously said he would resign in May of 2021, however he stepped down on December 31st 2020. Current chair of the engineering school, Dr. John L. Junkins, has stepped in as interim president until a replacement is found.

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College President’s Report April-May

Appointments

University of Nebraska Names Prime Candidate for President

Joanne Li has been named the prime candidate for chancellor at the University of Nebraska. She will become the first woman of color to take the position (after a 30 day public vetting period).

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CUNY Medgar Evers Names First African American President

Dr. Patricia Ramsey has been announced as the first woman to lead CUNY Medgar Evers in Brooklyn. She previously served as the Senior Executive Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. She will begin May 1st.

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***Stay up-to-date with all the changes in Higher Ed administrations through HigherEd Direct…Try our database today for free HERE.

Board names Sixth President at Holy Family

The board of Trustees has announced that Dr. Anne M. Prisco will become the school’s Sixth president. She will begin in July of 2021

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New President Named at Indiana

Pamela Whitten, current president of Kennesaw State, has been named the 19th President of Indiana University. She will begin her tenure on July 1st 2021.

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Interim President Announced by Board at Oregon State

The Board of Trustees at Oregon State has voted to place Rebecca Johnson as the school’s interim president. Johnson has served as VP of OSU – Cascades since 2009. She will begin her interim presidency on May 1st and serve until a permanent president is appointed.

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Interim President Selected at Iowa

Board of Regents have selected Iowa’s Associate Provost and Dean of Graduate College, John Keller, to serve as Iowa’s interim president. Current president Bruce Harreld announced his retirement in October 2020.Keller will begin on May 17.

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Dr. Susan Poser Appointed President at Hofstra   

The board at Hofstra University has approved that Dr. Susan Poser will become the school’s next president. Poser currently serves as provost and vice chancellor for academics at the University of Illinois Chicago. She will become the schools first female president on August 1st.

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Claremont Lincoln President Announces New Leader

Claremont Lincoln has announced that Dr. Lynn Priddy will become the school’s next president. Priddy will begin on April 1st and replace tony Digiovanni who is retiring and remaining on the board of directors.

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North Shore CC Names Next Leader

William Heineman has been named the next president at North Shore Community College. Is the current provost at Northern Essex CC.

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Northern Penn Names Next President

The Board of Trustees has named Susan Snelick to become the schools next president. Snelick will begin this summer.

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OKC University Hires New President

Oklahoma City University has announced that current president of Lamar University, Kenneth Evans, will become the school’s new president. He will become the 19th president on July 1st 2021.

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Board Selects Next President at Oklahoma State

The Oklahoma State University A&M Board of regents has picked Dr. Kayse Shrum to become the schools 19th president. Shrum currently serves as president of the OSU Center for Health and Sciences in Tulsa Oklahoma. Shrum will become the school’s first female leader on July 1st.

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Point Park University Selects Next President

Point Park University has approved Donald J. Green as the university’s 8th president.  Green is the current president of Georgia Highlands College in Rome. He will begin this summer after the retirement of Dr. Paul Hennigan.

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Rhode Island Names New President

The Board of Trustees at The University of Rhode Island has named Marc Parlange President of the school. Parlange currently serves as provost at Monash University in Australia and will begin in August.

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New President at Tulsa

Brad Carson has been named the next president at Tulsa University. He will begin his tenure on July 21st 2021

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VMI Announces Next President

Major General Cedric Wins will become the next leader of the Virginia Military Institute. Wins graduated in 1985 and began his interim leadership last year.

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Lehigh President Selected         

The Lehigh Board has announced the selection of Joseph J. Helble to become the school’s next president. Helble currently serves as the Lehigh’s provost and will begin his presidency on August 16.

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Nevada State Announces New President

Regents have approved DeRionne Pollard to become Nevada State’s next president. Pollard is the current president at Montgomery College in Maryland.

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New Chancellor Selected at Rutgers – Camden

Antonio D. Tillis has been announced as the next Chancellor at Rutgers – Camden. Tillis will begin his post on July 1st 2021.

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Iowa Announces Next President

Barbara Wilson has been announced as the 22nd president of the University of Iowa. Wilson currently serves as executive VP and VP for academic affairs for the University of Illinois System. She will begin her roll as president on July 15th, 2021.

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Retirements

Dominican President Set to Retire

Donna Carroll has announced that she will retire as president from Dominican University. Carroll has served the school for 27 years and will leave at the end of this academic year.

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Howard Community College President to Retire

Dr. Kathleen Hetherington has announced that she plans leave her post as president at Howard Community College. Hetherington has served as the school’s leader since 2007 and will retire on October 1, 2021.

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Southern Oregon President Retiring

President Linda Schott has announced her intention to retire as president by the end of 2021. Schott said, “this was a fitting time for her to pass leadership on.”

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Resignations

Seattle President to Resign

Seattle Pacific President Daniel Martin has announced that he will resign from his position effective April 5,2021. Martin served as leader for 9 years.

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Tuskegee University President Resigns

Gilbert L Rochon has announced that he is resigning from his post immediately. Dr Rochon served for six years. No reason was given for the resignation.

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Southern Oregon President Retiring

President Linda Schott has announced her intention to retire as president by the end of 2021. Schott said, “this was a fitting time for her to pass leadership on.”

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Marshall University President to Step Down

President Jerome A. Gilbert has announced that he will resign at the end of his term, which ends in July 2022. Gilbert said, “for a variety of personal and professional reasons, I have informed the Board of Governors that I will not seek an extension of my current contract and will be stepping down from my position effective July 15, 2022.”

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Oregon State University President Resigns

Oregon State President, F. King Alexander, has announced his resignation. The resignation comes on the heels of outrage stemming from his role in the LSU sexual misconduct scandal.

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College administrator Turnover

College Administrator Data/Turnover Rates: 2018-Present

New research from Higher Education Publications, Inc. indicates that top-level positions at colleges and universities are experiencing some of the highest employee turnover rates when compared to other administrators. Our analysis tracked administrators at accredited colleges and universities in the United States and found that presidents, chancellors and provosts were three of the top fifteen positions with the highest administrative turnover in the last 36 months. Provosts were number one in turnover.

Noted are the top 15 turnover percentages for college administrators tracked in the HEP, Inc. database since April 2018, or 36 months.

    1. Provosts 50%
    2. Dean of Education 44%
    3. Dean of Art and Science 42%
    4. Director of Branch Campus 42%
    5. Dean of Business 42%
    6. Director of Institutional Advancement 41%
    7. Director of Enrollment Management 39%
    8. Director of Diversity 39%
    9. Director of Admissions 39%
    10. Chief Financial/Business Officer 37%
    11. Chief Student Affairs/Student Life Officer 37%
    12. Associate Academic Officer 37%
    13. Chief Executive Officer (President/Chancellor) 36%
    14. Chief HR Officer 35%
    15. Director of Student Housing 35%

*Positions listed required a minimum of 700 reported administrator counts to be included. Administrator turnover rates are pulled from schools that reported that particular position in 2018 and 2021.

  • The average turnover rate of 125 different administrator positions tracked by HEP Inc. was 34%.
  • Of the 3,391 provosts reported by schools in The Higher Education Directory in 2018 and 2021, 1,691 or 50% are new as of April 2021.
  • Presidents and chancellors are 13th on the list with a total of 1,502 out of 4,135, or 36% being new.
  • Rounding out the bottom of the list with the lowest percentage turnover are directors of institutional research with 26% changed.

When compared to other administrators, the cause for such high-level turnover in presidents and provosts can be linked to many diverse issues such as growing financial instability, COVID, and faculty and Board pressures. Also, traditionally colleges and universities have made leadership selections from within, minimizing risk. According to the American Council on Education, 60 percent of current presidents at doctoral-granting universities were once provosts prior to accepting presidency. However, another study released by ACE found that only 30 percent of current provosts plan to pursue presidency. As a result, traditionally qualified presidents are becoming harder to find, thus creating a higher risk of turnover through a limited supply of conventional talent.

According to Roland King, former VP for public affairs at the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (an association of more than 1,000 private non-profit college presidents), finding qualified presidents is increasingly complicated. King says that half of exiting presidents in 2018 had a tenure of 10 years and that following an established president has its positives and negatives. He said, “certainly, long tenure indicates some level of institutional stability, and often a supportive board of trustees, but it also can point toward institutional atrophy. An administration can get lulled into a ‘way we’ve always done it’ mentality, ignore danger signs and fight change and innovation.”

According to R. William Funk, CEO of R. William Funk & Associates, “There has recently been a spate of presidents stepping down or retiring under a cloud of controversy. In some cases, the departure of the president has been hastened by wrongful deeds perpetuated by subordinates, while others are victims of greater student and faculty activists, board dysfunction, or the accumulation of controversial decisions they have made. Rightly or wrongly, the buck stops at the feet of the president.”

COVID-19 has undoubtedly increased issues facing upper level administrators since spring of 2019. According to an ACE survey done between April and July of 2020, currently the most pressing issues for presidents include long term financial viability, mental health of students, faculty and staff, and sustaining an online learning environment. According to Larry Lad, a senior consultant at the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, “Leadership is situational and presidents who were put into place to make incremental changes in a relatively stable environment can no longer count on the same set of skills to carry them through the coming months in years.”

Only time will tell whether top leaders can execute an acute understanding of today’s complex issues that are increasingly leading to involuntary turnover.  It’s difficult to predict whether COVID will keep turnover rates up, however you can stay up-to-date with college and university administrators through HigherEd Direct – the database used to compile this research article: Free Trial Here.

Controversial Accrediting Body Dangerously Close to Losing Federal Recognition

The Education Department has recommended withdrawing recognition of the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, or ACICS, as officials say the largest for-profit college accrediting agency has exhibited an “unprecedented level of noncompliance” in the past and present.  The potential termination comes on the heels of a damning Education Department report noting that ACICS is not meeting federal standards.

Education Department findings charge that the accrediting body consists of employees who simply lack qualifications, “the agency failed to demonstrate that it has competent and knowledgeable individuals, qualified by education and experience in their own right and trained by the agency on their responsibilities, as appropriate for their roles, regarding the agency’s standards, policies, and procedures.” This is not the first time Higher Ed policy experts have criticized the accrediting body.

Under Education Secretary Betsy Devos, ACICS (a historically for-profit accreditor), fought for its accreditation reinstatement after the Obama administration eliminated its recognition in 2016­ – citing pervasive compliance problems with schools who attained accreditation under the council. ACICS accredited and shuttered schools such as ITT Tech, The Corinthian Colleges, and other for-profit institutions “routinely failed to adequately police schools under its oversight,” according the Education Department. However, in March of 2018 a federal court found that ACICS’s 36,000 pages petitioning for recognition had not been entirely examined by Education Department officials in leu of revoking ACICS’s status. Secretary Devos then signed an official order retaining the status of ACICS as a federally recognized accrediting agency, citing a “flawed” decision-making process.

Four years later, US Department of Education officials have noted in a new report, ACICS is still not able to comply with federal requirements and has failed at protecting students and taxpayers. According to Kyle Southern, policy and advocacy director for higher education and workforce at Young Invincible:

Yesterday’s recommendation from the staff at the Education Department only affirms what too many people have known for too long: ACICS has failed in its responsibility to ensure its member institutions provide anything close to the quality of education new should expect from any college or university…we welcome this step in the process toward revoking ACICS as an accreditor and putting some of the worst actors in the field of higher education on notice. The National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI) should take this recommendation seriously, and the Department should ultimately fulfill its obligation to maintain the integrity of accreditation and access to federal funds.”

On February 24th, in an 11-to-1 vote, NACICQI voted in recommendation of discrediting ACICS. The Education Department is required to make its final decision within the next 90 days, after which ACICS can appeal the result to Education Secretary Miguel Cardona.

What does this mean for schools accredited by ACICS?

There are 55 ACICS accredited schools in the 2021 HigherEd Direct Database.  26 of those institutions have additional accreditations and will most likely not be impacted if ACICS loses federal recognition. Of the 29 that are alone accredited with ACICS, three are actively seeking alternative accreditors for recognition at this time. A list of 26 schools with sole ACICS accreditation can be found here.

Stay up to date with the ongoing ACICS recognition as well as all other school accreditations with HigherEd Direct, our online searchable database. We are the only single source reference tool for individual accreditations, from all Department of Education and CHEA recognized accrediting organizations, in the United States.

**View our database today at hepinc.com/free-trial**

Courts Force Education Department to Forgive $150 Million in Student Loans

The Department of Education will begin forgiving $150 million worth of student loan debt for those attending for-profit colleges that closed while students were still enrolled. Officials say that around 15,000 former students’ debts will be excused. The loans are being forgiven after a federal judge ruled that Education Secretary Betsy Devos was unlawfully delaying an Obama-era policy known as “borrower defense to repayment”.

Last year the Department of Education rolled back two Obama administration regulations aimed to protect students and hold for-profit colleges more accountable. One, the “borrower defense to repayment” was intended to go in place in July, and is designed to make it easier for students who said they were defrauded by their schools to get their loans potentially forgiven. The courts have ruled that Devos’ attempts to repeal the regulations are illegal. The Education Department will begin notifying former students today that it is forgiving around $150 million in student loan debt, over half of which will be cancelled for students who attended the now closed Corinthian Colleges.

 

*** Stay up-to-date with all the administrative changes in higher ed through our online database-HigherEd Direct– Free Trial Here!!

University of Mississippi Resigns

University of Mississippi President to Resign, Other Major Schools also Seeing Recent Turnover

Ole Miss Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter announced on Monday that he will resign from his post at this end of this calendar year. Vitter became chancellor of the school in January of 2016 after serving as provost and executive vice chancellor at Kansas. Some students were surprised to hear about Vitter’s resignation. Sophomore Zoe Thaw said, “I feel like he did a great job while he was here, and I don’t know why he would be stepping down.”

Recently, another negative spotlight on Ole Miss may have contributed to Vitter’s resignation. In September Ed Meek, a Mississippi graduate and media entrepreneur, posted a Facebook rant complaining of lower enrollment, deteriorating property values and pictures of two African American women with racial undertones. Though Chancellor Vitter immediately condemned the post, it’s apparent the controversy has something to do with Vitter stepping down. Others (Conservative Donors) cite the university becoming exceptionally divided under a progressive Vitter—with his pushing to remove the flag of the state, encouraging the prohibition of playing Dixie at football, a debacle with the selection of a new mascot, and other issues which they believe is causing athletics, enrollment and public image of the school to suffer.

Mississippi isn’t the only school that is facing major recent changes in leadership. In the past month Maryland, South Carolina, Colorado State, the Tennessee System, and South Florida all have presidents and chancellors who are either retiring or resigning. Two weeks ago, Maryland’s President Dr. Wallace D. Loh announced he will be leaving the university in June of 2019 after a college football player died during practice. Loh’s administration was found to be partially responsible for an athletic department that allowed players to be abused for years. Loh said, “I have accepted that responsibility.” Colorado State’s President Tony Frank has announced his resignation for next summer saying, “it’s now time for the next step in our university’s trajectory, and that will require the articulation of a new vision for Colorado State.”

As always, stay up-to-date with all the changes in higher education leadership through our President’s Report and our database HigherEd Direct. Check out a free trial here!

Female Athletic Directors Almost Double Since 1990, Still Lag at D-I Programs

New research from Higher Education Publications, Inc. indicates that the number of women in college athletic director positions has almost doubled since 1990.  Our analysis tracked athletic director data dating back to 1990 and found that the rate of female ADs has grown from 11% to 19.5% overall at NCAA colleges and universities in the United States.

Based on college administrator data from the HigherEd Direct Database, the report examined athletic directors in Divisions I, II, and III from 1990 until July of 2018. Currently, 200 of the 1022—or just over 19% of institutions listed, have female athletic directors.

        

More specifically, the number and percentage of female ADs currently at Division I, II, and III schools are:

  • Division I: 39 of 339 or 12%
  • Division II: 41 of 286 or 14%
  • Division III: 120 of 397 or 30%

In the so-called “Power Five Conferences” of the ACC, Big Ten, Pac-12, Big 12, and SEC, the numbers are lower with only five of the 65 athletic departments (7.6 %) being run by women—North Carolina State, Pitt, Penn State, Virginia and Washington. According to Penn State Athletic Director Sandy Barbour, one reason is the stereotype of football and the culture of the programs that surround it. Barbour said, “There is this notion that because women, in general, don’t play football, how would you administer or supervise it?”

Another obstacle inhibiting female athletic directors is the fact that the college administrators doing the hiring–chancellors and presidents–are disproportionately male as well. According to a previous report, presently only 16 of the 115 major research universities (schools such as Stanford, Michigan and Clemson) have female presidents. And According to the American Council on Education, 30% of all colleges and universities in the U.S. have female presidents (up from 9.5% in 1986).

Though slow, over the past two decades, the growth and progress made in the overall amount of female college presidents and athletic ADs is increasing, and many believe that the nature of hiring at the once male dominated position(s) is changing. Three of the top 15 schools in the final 2017 Associated Press football poll had female athletic directors. The ACC especially has made strides in hiring female ADs. Most Recently, UVA offered the top job to Carla Williams, making her the third female director in the conference after Pittsburg and NC State.

With as the number of sports fans and female athletes continuing to grow, the changing of perceptions and growing female representation in athletic programs will continue to follow, though it won’t be easy. Patti Phillips, CEO of the National Association of Collegiate Women Athletics Administrators (NACWAA) says, “The athletics world is realizing that women as athletic directors are doing a pretty good job and that they are very positive leaders who develop good programs,” she says. “… A woman’s voice in the department of athletics needs to be heard.”

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College Basketball

Undrafted Basketball Players Could Return to College Under New NCAA Rules

In response to federal investigations into several prominent college basketball programs last fall, the NCAA has announced new rules regarding men’s basketball and student athletes. Two of the most significant changes include allowing student athletes to participate in the NBA draft and return to college if undrafted, and requiring Division I schools to pay for tuition, fees and books for both men and women’s basketball players who left school and returned later to attain their degree.

Other noteworthy rule changes include:

  • Elite college players may be represented by an agent, who is certified by the NCAA, to help them make more informed decisions about turning pro.
  • High school basketball student-athletes can make more college campus visits, paid for by colleges, beginning as soon as the summer before their junior school year.
  • As a term of employment, school presidents and athletics staff will be personally accountable for their sports programs following the rules, including full cooperation in the investigations and infractions process.
  • Those schools who break rules face stronger penalties, including longer suspensions, playoff bans, and recruiting restrictions.

The new rules come on the heels of a Condoleezza Rice-led commission aimed at cleaning up college basketball. The NCAA notes the changes are intended “to promote integrity in the game, strengthen accountability and prioritize the interests of student-athletes over every other factor.” The changes will have to be approved by the NBA Players Union and be drafted into the league’s collective bargaining agreement. Officials for the NCAA acknowledge that this week’s announcement is only the start.

 

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New Report Shows DeVos Restored Controversial Accreditor Despite Staff Opposition

An internal draft report that was forced to be released by a lawsuit last week, shows that Betsy DeVos’s own staff at the Department of Education condemned the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) for once again failing to meet federal standards required for accreditation–with 57 of 93 standard criteria failing. The report goes on to recommend ACICS’s status as an accreditor be terminated. According to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Eric Kelderman, “For the second time in less than two years, officials at the U.S. Department of Education have recommended against approving a controversial accrediting agency that primarily oversees for-profit colleges.”

However, in April Secretary DeVos signed an official order reviving recognition of the disputed accrediting body. According an article by Erica Green in the The New York Times, “Education Secretary Betsy Devos disregarded a scathing review by her own staff this spring when she reinstated the watchdog body that had accredited two scandal-scarred for-profit universities whose bankruptcies left tens of thousands of students with worthless degrees and mountains of debt, a new report has revealed.”

Historically a for-profit accreditor, ACICS has fought for its accreditation reinstatement since the Obama administration eliminated its recognition in 2016 after reporting that the accreditor had failed to meet 21 of the 60 necessary criteria—citing “pervasive compliance problems” with schools which attained accreditation under the council. According to previous education secretary John King, ACICS “routinely failed to adequately police schools under its oversight,” including ITT Tech, The Corinthian Colleges, and other for-profit institutions.

DeVos’s order this spring to temporarily recognize ACICS came on the heels of a federal district judge’s ruling that previous secretary, John King, failed to consider key evidence and used a flawed process in removing ACICS accreditation. However, according to Alex Elson of the National Student Legal Defense Network, which sued to release the report, “Clearly she was well aware that ACICS was getting worse, not better, and has been working to help them anyway.” The report noted that ACICS had failed to demonstrate its evaluation of school compliance with federal student loan aid laws as well as documentation that they failed to implement graduate rate standards for schools, reforms that were promised this year.

A statement from the Education Department’s Frank Brogan called the report “an incomplete, pre-decisional document that may include errors of fact or omissions on the part of staff analysts.” While temporary, with restored recognition more than 100 colleges under ACICS will again be eligible to receive federal student aid. The department’s announcement does not entirely reverse the Obama era ban but allows ACICS continued recognition for an additional 6 months while the department “conducts a further review of ACICS’s 2016 petition for recognition.”

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Student Loans

Student Loan Debt Tops $1.5 Trillion Mark

According to the United States Federal Reserve, outstanding student loan debt has reached an all-time high of $1.52 trillion—up in the last ten years from $619 billion—an increase of over 145%. The new number surpasses all auto and credit card debts held by Americans and sees no signs of slowing.

A few reasons for increased student debt rates:

  • Slower repayment when compared to credit card and car loans
  • Constant cycle of new borrowers
  • Stagnant wages
  • Federal and State funding decreases causing higher tuition rates/fees

Currently, over half of student loan borrowers leaving school owe at least $20,000. That’s double, up from 25 percent in the last decade. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau released a study that analyzed borrowers who began repaying loans from 2002 to 2014 and looked at their repayment status through 2016. The data suggests that:

  • At least 40 percent of borrowers owe over $30,000.
  • Thirty percent of student loan borrowers are behind their loan balances after five years in repayment.
  • 50 percent of student loan borrowers are over 34 when they start repaying their loans.
  • 60 percent of those who cannot reduce their balances are delinquent.

The CFPB’s report also indicated growth in awareness among private companies who offer incentives to employees with student debt. Employers are increasingly helping their employees who borrowed by offering repayment assistance and other programs designed to help those in debt. Additionally, programs like the Public Service Loan Forgiveness plan allow borrowers employed in government and non-profit sectors to cancel debts after 10 years of non-delinquent payments. However, with student debts increasingly exceeding incomes, it’s a wonder if many repayments are even feasible.

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